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5 Creepy Christmas songs

Feminist Frequency explores a few Christmas songs: I have to say, I agree about most of Sarkeesian’s analysis of the songs, particularly “All I want for Christmas is You” and “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas.”  I have to say that upon reflection, her points about the other songs are strong too, but […]

“I think Crabtown would look lovely in the autumn…” (Another furniture construction project)

For the first time in six years, we decided to put up the Christmas Village, one of my favorite decorations of the holiday season, but something I’ve had to keep squirreled away while the children were too young to be trusted around it.  But when we started contemplating putting up the village a couple weeks […]

Adventures in Bug Hunting: Or, PHP 5.3, why can’t you handle whitespace?

Caution: NERD TALK AHEAD A couple years ago, I created a request system for my department which would allow users to register their teaching preferences.  This wasn’t really anything new, many other people have done it (I did it for my department at University of Florida years ago).  In the years since, I’ve tweaked it […]

Six points for a blogging class

I’m speaking in a class about blogging today, and feeling a bit out of my depth.  Sure, I’m a blogger. Sure, I’ve been keeping this blog for nearly a decade.  But I don’t make a living at it.  And if you’re a regular reader, you know that my ability to update regularly is spotty at […]

Privilege and humor – Whose experience is being mocked?

There’s been quite a bit of commentary lately about privilege.  It’s a concept that finally seems to have some mainstream bite, and deserves serious consideration. In case this is new to you, the basic idea of privilege in this context is the idea that different people have different experiences in society because of factors outside […]

When nothing goes out of print, old and new lose much of their meaning (Lessons from The Long Tail)

Two lessons springing from the long tail (the idea that the digital age makes permanent publication of everything more possible). ONE: Shame, public consequences, satire Particularly interesting last week was the flameout of Pax Dickinson, the Chief Technology Officer of Business Insider.  For those who missed the brouhaha I point you to the summary at […]

Pardon the Intrusion: one more test

So my last test failed, in that my posts are still showing up twice on my Facebook feed.  But I figured out why. Before Jetpack was installed, I had used TwitterTools to post my blog posts on Twitter.  At some point Twitter Tools updated so that it used “Social” to post to Twitter. Of course, […]

Facebook likes for sad events: the digital condolence five

In “Good Crazy,” a season 7 episode of How I Met Your Mother, Barney comes up with a “Condolence Five,” a way to offer condolences to someone about something sad.  He keeps saying “It’s a thing.”  Of course, in classic #HIMYM fashion, by the end of the episode it IS a thing that Barney uses […]

How to view two Excel Spreadsheets in two different windows

But here’s how you do it in Windows 8: 1. Open Excel. 2. Switch to your app screen or whatever they call it 3. Right click on the Excel app 4. Select “open new window” in the option bar at the bottom. This will open Excel as a separate window which you can then treat […]

We’re surrounded!: Universities, Electracy, and the coming tsunami, part 4

This is the fourth in a four-part blog series taking a snapshot of the current economic, political, and grammatological situation facing the modern American university system.  In part one, I provided a preface for this discussion.  Parts two, three, and four focus specifically on pressures from different quarters challenging us to re-imagine what it is […]

Punctuation matters: establishing your ethos (or failing to)

Like many writing and rhetoric instructors, I focus a lot of energy on helping students wrestle with the concept of ethos, the image, reputation, and authority the author presents on her own behalf to the reader.  This concept becomes most important as we discuss two issues writers must face: proper grammar and citations. With citations, […]

It will never get harder to copy things: Universities, Electracy, and the coming tsunami, part 3

This is the third in a four-part blog series taking a snapshot of the current economic, political, and grammatological situation facing the modern American university system.  In part one, I provided a preface for this discussion.  Parts two, three, and four focus specifically on pressures from different quarters challenging us to re-imagine what it is […]

Death from Above: Universities, Electracy, and the coming tsunami, part 2

This is the second in a four-part blog series taking a snapshot of the current economic, political, and grammatological situation facing the modern American university system.  In part one, I provided a preface for this discussion.  Parts two, three, and four focus specifically on pressures from different quarters challenging us to re-imagine what it is […]

Too long for a bumper sticker, but awesome anyway.

From one of PZ Myers’ recent posts about gender equality: Here’s the deal, Fox News. The world is changing. It’s not getting worse, it’s getting different, and I know that’s the kind of thing that makes bitter, cranky old conservatives weep into their scotch and water, but deal with it. Besides, you’ll be dead soon […]

Dyson vacuum brush won’t turn

Another in our series of technical posts for specific problems.  Enjoy. We put vacuum cleaners through the meat grinder over here, what with two cats and a dog and two active children.  Anyhow, our Dyson FancyPants™ vacuum wasn’t working very well, so we went to work on it.  First, we discovered that one of the […]